Wednesday, September 9, 2015

Valuable Lesson - #NaBloPoMo #septemberchallenge 7

NaBloPoMo 
September 2015  Everyday Gyaan

Wednesday, September 9, 2015

What is a valuable lesson you learned from a teacher?

~~~oOo~~~

As I went through all my years of schooling, from kindergarten through graduating college, I recall many wonderful teachers.  There was my 1st 5th grade teacher, Miss Martha Shaner, at Johnson Heights Elementary School in Cumberland, MD.  (We moved to Salt Lake City in the middle of my 5th grade year.)  She had my classmates write stories for me about the adventures I would have in the "Wild West".  At the time, I had no idea that Utah was even a state, let alone its location.  Let me tell you, I was quite the little heroine!

Another teacher I remember was my 11th grade English teacher.  Unfortunately I do not remember her name.  She had severe black shoulder-length hair.  I signed up for a Shakespeare class in my senior year partly because, hey, it was Shakespeare, and partly because this instructor was teaching the course.

I remember the class was having a discussion.  She asked a question and one of the other students was answering, giving a detailed response.  The teacher looked at this student and said, "You argued your point very well.  You're wrong, of course, but you made a good case."  That was going on four decades ago, but I still remember where I sat in the class and I can 'see' her saying that.

She did not mean it in a belittling way.  She acknowledged the student's effort and use of his (or her) discussion skills.  I hope that student learned as much as I did that day.

What was my lesson?  I can get my point across while disagreeing with someone in an agreeable manner.  I have as much right as the next person to express my point of view, even if it is wrong or in the minority.  And I better be ready to defend my position.  No one (well very few) sets out to do an awful job.  I have learned from the examples of others, and hopefully have given a few good examples myself.

~~~oOo~~~

What is an important lesson you have learned in your life?

16 comments:

  1. To pay attention and think twice before speaking. I don't usually put it to good use and so I say the silliest of things....I remember a teacher like yours, I will never forget her.

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    1. Everybody says silly things sometimes, Orana! (Beautiful name BTW).

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  2. I think positive criticism that gives feedback but still points out where the person was incorrect can be a great learning tool (it obviously was in your case!)

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    1. Hearing we are wrong is never easy, but hearing it that way makes it easier to accept and to change. Thanks for visiting Leanne!

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  3. I loved studying Shakespeare in school and subsequently for my MA. I loved teachers who knew what they were talking about, spoke their mind and were not afraid to say they didn't know something. I can see how that lesson would stay with you. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Thank you for sharing your thoughts Corinne! Always glad to find another "sister in Shakespeare"!

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  4. Your 11th Grade English teacher sounds like a real sensible lady... I wish there were more people like that!

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    1. Exactly, Ankita! If everyone would look to themselves first, think how much better the world would be!

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  5. Hi it is not to late to link up this week. Here is the link:
    http://www.maryanderingcreatively.com/literacy-musing-mondays-week-34/

    Also any post related to love of learning, literacy, and book reviews are welcome.

    I love that you learned a lot from your teachers. Teachers are special people. ;)

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    1. Thanks for the heads up, Mary. I appreciate it!

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  6. This incident reminds me of my English teacher back in high school. For a teacher it is quite important to know how to share their criticism. Students are young and sensitive; any severe action could have a negative impact. Your teacher in this case handles it perfectly.

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  7. Respect is so important! We can respectfully debate and argue and make a big impact. It makes me think of how Paul testified about Jesus in the New Testament!

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    1. And I imagine Paul had a lot of mistrust to overcome from his pre-Christian days. That fact that he could do that and spread the gospel is a testament to his God-given abilities.

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  8. I know what you mean about needing to be able to back up your opinions and ideas no matter if they are wrong and right. I am impressed you can remember this, which means the whole situation must have had quite the impact on you!

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